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Pex’s Free Attribution Engine Empowers Rights Clarity for Online Video and Audio

Pex, the service that fingerprints, tracks, and attributes online audio and video content, has launched a powerful new product for content creators, rights-holders and platforms --completely free of charge.

The Attribution Engine (AE) allows content creators and rights-holders to register their video and audio library with AE and establish custom distribution and licensing rules for their content. This ownership information will be transmitted in appropriate form so that platforms understand who the original creators are. Any ownership conflicts will be settled through an efficient and transparent process to reduce friction and copyright trolling. All user accounts must be verified, and no anonymous activity is permitted. Users can register now for free by contacting ae@pex.com.

“We know the health and vitality of online content systems, spread across dozens of platforms, depends on a clear framework for claiming and protecting creator rights,” explains Amadea Choplin, COO of Pex. “Without this clarity, rights-holders are often bogged down in takedown and other types of claims, and creators of new content that may draw on older works can’t get a clear answer about how to license content and on what terms.”

Attribution Engine draws on Pex’s fingerprinting and matching technologies, processing queries at a pace that puts other content identification systems to shame. It can find snippets as short as a second long. It can identify content that has been significantly modified or distorted, extracting melodies that may be subject to copyright.

“Until platforms know who made what, who content belongs to, they can’t properly execute a system for licensing and compensating creators.” says Choplin. “Attribution Engine is designed to offer a neutral third-party cost-free solution to rights-holders big and small, and to introduce the necessary layer into the system that will level the playing field for creators of all sizes and types.”

Read more about Attribution Engine in a blogpost here.

About Pex
Pex delivers independent video and music analytics and rights management services to enable creators, rights holders and marketers to find, measure and leverage the value of content across the Web. It can find snippets as short as 1 second across dozens of platforms worldwide. Clients include major music companies, video rights holders, and other key content producers and administrators. For more information, please visit pex.com/.

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