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Soundrop and Save the Children Launch New Musical Side of Successful Create for Kids Program

As part of global humanitarian organization Save the Children’s Create for Kids program, Soundrop and its artists are donating tracks to build a unique compilation that highlights young musicians and artistic creativity. Alus and Astrid (of The Voice Kids UK fame) have already given music to the project, which will be released August 15, 2019. (More artists to be announced July 30.) Participating artists will donate their tracks for exclusive distribution as part of this charitable initiative, with 100% of reported revenue going to Save the Children.

In past years, Create for Kids has collaborated with creators on platforms like Twitch to raise money for charity’s diverse programs. Many of these creators had a strongly visual side to their work, leading to the project’s signature coloring book. This is the first collaboration with musical artists and a distribution service. 

It’s a natural fit for the creator-first, democratic distributor and its artists. “Our Soundrop Artists already make the world a better place every day through their positivity, creativity, and community building,” explains Soundrop Brand Manager Zach Domer (better known as “Pony”). “Joining forces for this project allows our creators to do what they do best for a cause that anyone can get behind: helping kids in need. The best part is that listeners and fans will be supporting Save the Children simply by streaming and downloading these songs as they normally would, so everyone wins!”
“We are looking forward to expanding on the success of our Create for Kids campaign by launching a special way for musicians to support the event,” says Lisa Smith, Associate Director of Digital Peer to Peer Fundraising for Save the Children. “Save the Children is very thankful to Soundrop for stepping up to partner with us on this exciting new project that will serve as an incredible platform for talented musicians to show off their work.”

For the Soundrop artists taking part in the initiative, donating a track was an easy decision, an extension of their values and goals as creators. “I am so excited to be part of the Save the Children compilation,” Astrid, age 10, notes. “It’s a charity helping children, which is the intention of my original song, ‘The Little Jazz Singer,’ to support other kids, like me, to be the best version of themselves! It’s my honour to support this charity!”

“Music has healing powers that can ignite a happy soul,” says Alus. “Donating a song to Save the Children is the least I can do to help children celebrate their creativity.”

Save the Children believes every child deserves a future. Since our founding 100 years ago, we’ve changed the lives of more than 1 billion children. In the United States and around the world, we give children a healthy start in life, the opportunity to learn and protection from harm. We do whatever it takes for children – every day and in times of crisis – transforming their lives and the future we share. Follow us on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and YouTube.

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